Letters Blogatory

The Blog of International Judicial Assistance | By Ted Folkman of Folkman LLC

Posts tagged “Qatar

Case of the Day: Broidy Capital Management v. Benomar

Posted on December 10, 2019

Today’s case of the day, Broidy Capital Management LLC v. Benomar (2d Cir. 2019), is at the intersection of cloak-and-dagger intrigue, international law, and the Trump era. Elliott Broidy was the deputy finance chair of the Republican National Committee. He alleged that the State of Qatar and its agents had hacked his computers, stolen trade secrets and personal information, and passed it to the media. Qatar’s motive, according to Broidy, was to “discredit Broidy and curtail his influence,” because he was “an influential detractor responsible for President Trump’s public criticism of Qatar in June 2017.” Broidy sued Jamal Benomar in the Southern District of New York, alleging that he was a “secret Qatari agent,” and that he “had been paid by Qatar to participate…

+Read more

Case of the Day: Dahman v. Embassy of Qatar

Posted on January 30, 2019

The case of the day is Dahman v. Embassy of Qatar (D.D.C. 2019). I wrote about the case last year. El-Sayed Dahman, an accountant, worked for the Embassy of Qatar. The embassy terminated his employment, perhaps as a matter of policy due to his age, and he brought an action for age discrimination. So far, so good. There are, unfortunately, foreign governments that discriminate on the basis of age as a matter of policy when employing people in the United States, and the cases generally say that if the employee’s employment is “commercial” (factors can include the nationality of the worker, the nature of his or her duties, etc.), there is no FSIA immunity in such a case because of the commercial activity exception.

+Read more

Case of the Day: Dahman v. Embassy of Qatar

Posted on July 30, 2018

The case of the day is Dahman v. Embassy of the State of Qatar (D.D.C. 2018). El-Sayed Dahman, an Egyptian national who lived in Virginia, was employed by the Qatari Embassy as its chief accountant. When he turned 65, the Embassy discharged him. There was no question that his age was the reason for the discharge—both the Ambassador and the Director of Human Resources said so in writing. Qatar evidently had a policy of firing employees when they reached what it regarded as the retirement age. Dahman sued under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act. Qatar defaulted, and on a motion for default judgment, the court had to determine whether Qatar had foreign sovereign immunity.

+Read more