Tag Archives: FSIA

Editorial: No on the Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act

The proposed Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act, S. 2040, has been in the news recently. The Saudi government has made economic threats to try to deter Congress from passing the bill. The bill was introduced in the Senate in September 2015 and was reported by the Committee on the Judiciary, in an amended form, in February 2016. There was some discussion of the bill, though not really substantive, during the Judiciary Committee hearing.
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Case of the Day: Lin v. United States

The case of the day is Lin v. United States (D.D.C. 2016). The plaintiffs were residents of Taiwan. Their claim was that in 1946, the government of the Republic of China—that is, the nationalist government that the United States, at the time, recognized as the government of China—issued decrees that had the effect of depriving people living in Taiwan of their Japanese nationality. They sued the Republic of China as well as the United States. The claim against the United States was that in 1946, the ROC government was the agent of the United States, making the United States vicariously liable. No one could accuse the plaintiff’s lawyer of lacking courage.
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Case to Watch: Merlini v. Consulate General of Canada

Readers, here is an interesting case to watch: Merlini v. Consulate General of Canada. It’s an appeal from a decision of the Massachusetts Department of Industrial Accidents Reviewing Board. The Appeals Court will hear argument in the case in a week or so. Full disclosure: I am counsel to the appellant, Cynthia Merlini, though I didn’t represent her in the DIA proceedings that are on appeal.
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