Tag Archives: meta

Lago Agrio: Are The Disclosures About Doug Cassel’s Work for Chevron Sufficient?

Readers, I feel a sense of responsibility when someone who contributes to Letters Blogatory gets in some sort of trouble on account of what he or she has written here. The first instance of this was the case of Allison Morris, a journalist with the Irish News. Those of you who followed the Belfast Project case will remember Morris had interviewed Dolours Price, and there was some reason to think that her articles about that interview led to the Belfast Project fiasco. Anthony McIntyre, one of the men who conducted the interviews with former IRA members that the Northern Irish authorities sought and obtained from the United States under the US/UK MLAT, claimed that Morris was a police informer and an agent of the British state, which, she claimed, put her life in danger. Morris then complained to the National Union of Journalists, which suspended McIntyre. McIntyre appealed, and I noted that Morris, his accuser, did not appear at the hearing. Although I hadn’t asked her for her explanation, Morris wrote that she didn’t attend because of work commitments and because of the financial strain financing the trip to London. It turned out that she had sent a bunch of tweets that showed that she had traveled to a soccer match at the time of the hearing. So maybe her earlier explanation on Letters Blogatory was untrue, though in my view her sin was a venial one; but McIntyre and his allies piled on in a way that to me seemed cruel and over-the-top, even if they would have been within their rights to have a laugh at Morris’s blooper.

Now it is Doug Cassel’s turn. Continue reading Lago Agrio: Are The Disclosures About Doug Cassel’s Work for Chevron Sufficient?

Letters Blogatory’s Annual Appeal For Nominations

Readers, once each year—just once!—I come to you and humbly ask for your nominations for the ABA Blawg 100, a listing of what the ABA thinks are the 100 best legal blogs. I almost forgot this year—nominations are due on August 16! If you’ve gotten something useful from my continuing coverage of major cases such as the Chevron/Ecuador case, my reports on new decisions and developments in the world of private international law, the fabulous Spanish language spin-off blog, Cartas Blogatorias, or frolics and detours like my editorial in favor of the leap second or my annual April Fool’s post, please take a minute and nominate me.

Now, I know there are bloggers out there who would poo-pooh the whole idea of seeking the nomination. One of the crustiest of blogging curmudgeons, Scott Greenfield, comes to mind. Here’s what Scott wrote just a couple of days ago about the supposed death of the useful or practical legal blog:

And yet, the ones with something to sell persist. The practical blawgosphere is dead. The marketing blawgosphere remains. It’s apparently no more effective than it’s ever been, as tech start-ups burst onto the scene and disappear as soon as cash burn silences the silly hype, but their lovers remain, pushing an agenda of the new normal.

But the lawyers are gone. Except me, but then, I’m an old fool who refuses to realize that the party is over and everybody has gone home to sleep it off.

Let’s prove him wrong!

Thanks as always for reading, and thanks for your support!

The Year In Review 1: Top Posts On Letters Blogatory

Happy New Year! As I did last year, I’m providing a list of the top ten posts on Letters Blogatory, counted by unique pageviews on the Web (i.e., not including people who read the post via email subscription, or an RSS feed, or some other way). I’ve excluded index pages, for example, my page indexing all Lago Agrio posts, or my page indexing my FOIA posts, and of course excluding the home page. I think the lessons for me this year are to keep working to have excellent guest-posters, and to pray that the Lago Agrio case goes on forever.
Continue reading The Year In Review 1: Top Posts On Letters Blogatory