Tag Archives: Email

Case of the Day: SEC v. Dubovoy

The case of the day is Securities & Exchange Commission v. Dubovoy (D.N.J. 2016). The SEC sued Nikolai Slepenkov and Maxim Zakharchenko, both Russian nationals, alleging violations of § 17(a) of the Securities Act of 1933 and §§ 10(b), 20(b), and 20(e) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. The claim was that Ukrainian hackers hacked into wire service computers and stole not-yet-public press releases, which they passed to traders such as Slepenkov and Zakharchenko, who then traded illegally on the information. The traders, including Slepenkov and Zakharchenko, allegedly made $100 million in profit over the life of the scheme. The SEC sought leave to serve process on the two by email.
Continue reading Case of the Day: SEC v. Dubovoy

Case of the Day: Ahrens v. Pecknick

The First Thanksgiving at Plymouth
Letters Blogatory wishes all its readers a happy Thanksgiving Day! Credit: Stedelijk Museum De Lakenhal

A note to readers: Due to my travel schedule, there will likely be no new posts next week, and I may not respond to your comments or emails as quickly as I ordinarily do. Also, thank you for your feedback on political posts. I am going to continue writing them, but I am going to segregate them from the ordinary posts. My current thought is to put them at politics.blogatory.com, but if anyone can come up with a good pun or similarly catchy name that uses “blogatory,” I’m all ears. Also, by separating the political posts, I think we can open up some new possibilities, such as regular contributing authors. So if you are interested in writing about US (or non-US) politics at the new blog, whatever it ends up being called, let’s talk!

The case of the day is Ahrens v. Pecknick (D. Nev. 2016). Edd H. Ahrens sued Windermere Holdings Group, Ltd. and others for copyright infringement and unjust enrichment. Windermere was a Seychelles company. Ahrens attempted service via the central authority, but the Article 6 certificate stated that Windermere was no longer registered, and the process server’s declaration said that Windermere was no present at the address where he attempted service. Ahrens sought leave to serve process by email, using an email address found doing a WHOIS search of the domain name Windermere used for its website.
Continue reading Case of the Day: Ahrens v. Pecknick

Case of the Day: Toyo Tire & Rubber v. CIA Wheel Group

The case of the day is Toyo Toy & Rubber Co. v. CIA Wheel Group (C.D. Cal. 2016). Toyo sued Hong Kong Tri–Ace Tire Co. and Jinlin Ma for trade dress infringement, fraud, unfair competition, etc. They sought leave to serve process by email. Both defendants were thought to be in Hong Kong, but Toyo, after some investigation, did not know their address.
Continue reading Case of the Day: Toyo Tire & Rubber v. CIA Wheel Group