Letters Blogatory

The Blog of International Judicial Assistance | By Ted Folkman of Folkman LLC

Posts tagged “Israel

Interesting Issue of the Day: Recognition of Remote Civil Marriages In Israel

Posted on January 25, 2021

The Forward and friend of Letters Blogatory Eugene Volokh have both written about an interesting case before the Israeli Supreme Court. In Israel, which kept the old Ottoman laws on personal status after independence, all marriages must be contracted in a religious ceremony; there is no civil marriage. This law makes it impossible for some Jews to marry in Israel, for example, because the Chief Rabbinate does not recognize one of the spouses as Jewish. Many Israelis in this situation have gone to Cyprus to have a civil marriage, and under ordinary rules of private international law Israeli courts do recognize such marriages as valid (because they were valid where contracted). But COVID travel restrictions have made that avenue difficult. Enter Utah, which allows…

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Case of the Day: Appel v. Hayut

Posted on December 23, 2020

The case of the day is Appel v. Hayut (SDNY 2020). The plaintiff, Ronit Appel, served process on David Kazhdan, a defendant in Israel, by hiring Rimon Deliveries and Services, apparently an Israeli delivery company, which then mailed the documents to Kazhdan through the Israeli post. Just so that this is clear, the documents were mailed from Rimon, in Israel, to Kazhdan, in Israel. Thus this is not the ordinary postal channels case where the question is the sufficiency of mail sent from the United States to the state of destination.

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Everything About The Tlaib/Omar Story Is Terrible

Posted on August 18, 2019

Everything about the story of Representatives Omar and Tlaib’s aborted visit to Israel is terrible. No one in the whole affair has acted well. And the political motive for the whole fiasco—Donald Trump’s attempt to drive American Jews into the arms of the Republican Party—is so venal, so transparent, and, I hope, so doomed to failure that it makes me despair.

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