Case of the Day: Icon DE Holdings v. Eastside Distributors

The case of the day is Icon DE Holdings LLC v. Eastside Distributors (S.D.N.Y. 2015). Icon sued Eastside and served process in Quebec. The precise manner of service was unclear. Icon claimed it proceeded via the Quebec central authority. But while I see an affidavit of service from the process server I don’t see an Article 6 certificate from the central authority. My assumption is that Icon properly sent a request for service to the central authority but that instead of sending back an Article 6 certificate the central authority sent the affidavit.

In any event, Icon served the documents in English but without a French translation. It obtained a default judgment. Eastside successfully moved to vacate the judgment on grounds of insufficient service of process. The case was again before the court on Icon’s motion for reconsideration.
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A Comparative Look At The New Hague Principles on Choice of Law & the Restatement (Second) of Conflict of Laws: First Post

As promised, here is the first post in what I hope will be a short series of posts comparing the new Hague Principles on Choice of Law in International Commercial Contracts and the Restatement (Second) of Conflict of Laws. I had a pleasant surprise after noting the publication of the Principles last month: Marta Pertegás, the First Secretary of the Permanent Bureau of the Hague Conference, took an interest in the idea of the post. From this, Jonathan Levin, an NYU law student who is interning this summer at the Permanent Bureau, independently offered to conduct a comparative study for the purposes of these posts. I’ll publish his report with the last post in the series.
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