Letters Blogatory

The Blog of International Judicial Assistance | By Ted Folkman of Folkman LLC

Posts tagged “Morocco

Case of the Day: Broidy Capital Management v. Benomar

Posted on December 10, 2019

Today’s case of the day, Broidy Capital Management LLC v. Benomar (2d Cir. 2019), is at the intersection of cloak-and-dagger intrigue, international law, and the Trump era. Elliott Broidy was the deputy finance chair of the Republican National Committee. He alleged that the State of Qatar and its agents had hacked his computers, stolen trade secrets and personal information, and passed it to the media. Qatar’s motive, according to Broidy, was to “discredit Broidy and curtail his influence,” because he was “an influential detractor responsible for President Trump’s public criticism of Qatar in June 2017.” Broidy sued Jamal Benomar in the Southern District of New York, alleging that he was a “secret Qatari agent,” and that he “had been paid by Qatar to participate…

+Read more

Case of the Day: DeJoria v. Maghreb Petroleum Exploration

Posted on August 20, 2019

The case of the day is DeJoria v. Maghreb Petroleum Exploration S.A. (5th Cir. 2019). I covered a prior Fifth Circuit decision back in 2015, and an even earlier district court decision in 2014. John Paul DeJoria,the billionaire behind the Paul Mitchell hair care line, went into the oil exploration business, hoping to discover reserves in Morocco. The Moroccan government supported the project. But when his venture failed to find the hoped-for reserves, he had to flee the company. Eventually he was sued by the new management of the venture, Maghreb Petroleum Exploration, sued DeJoria in Morocco and obtained a judgment for more than $100 million. Maghreb came to Texas to seek recognition and enforcement.

+Read more

Case of the Day: DeJoria v. Maghreb Petroleum Exploration

Posted on November 16, 2015

The case of the day is DeJoria v. Maghreb Petroleum Exploration, S.A. (5th Cir. 2015). This is the appeal of the case of the day from September 4, 2014. I won’t repeat the facts from the prior post: the question in the case was whether a Moroccan judgment should be recognized, and in particular whether Morocco provides impartial tribunals and procedures compatible with the requirements of due process of law.

+Read more