Tag Archives: Ethiopia

Case of the Day: Doe v. Ethiopia

The case of the day is Doe v. Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia (D.D.C. 2016). The plaintiff, who sued using a pseudonym, was an Ethiopian who had been given political asylum in the US in the 1990s and who was now a US citizen. He alleged that he was an activist in the Ethiopian community, and that the Ethiopian government engaged in electronic surveillance against him and others. The details of the alleged surveillance, as summarized by the court, are interesting. Doe alleged that his personal computer at home had been infected with “FinSpy.”
Continue reading Case of the Day: Doe v. Ethiopia

Case of the Day: Ido v. Attorney General

The case of the day is Ido v. Attorney General (11th Cir. 2014). Yelkal Ido, an Ethopian national, sought asylum in the United States. His claim, recounted in the Eleventh Circuit’s 2012 decision, was that he had ties to the Oromo Liberation Front, an “outlawed nationalist movement that has taken up arms against the Ethiopian government because of its perceived marginalization of the Oromo.” In 2006, an immigration judge denied the claim on the grounds that Ido’s testimony was not credible. The Board of Immigration Appeals affirmed, basing its decision on the judge’s adverse credibility finding. In 2012, the Eleventh Circuit agreed with the BIA’s conclusion that Ido was not credible, but it remanded for a determination whether the documentary evidence Ido had presented independently supported his claim. The BIA again rejected the claim, and Ido again appealed.
Continue reading Case of the Day: Ido v. Attorney General