Archives

Case of the Day: Zaft v. Golan

The case of the day is Zaft v. Golan (N.D. Fla. 2013). It’s an older case that just came across my screen and is worth a mention. Gidon Zaft, an American, and Yair Golan, an Israeli, were parties to a partnership agreement under which Zaft owned 70% of Royal Moroccan Inc., a Floridan corporation, and Golan owned 30%. The agreement had Florida choice of law and choice of forum agreements, and it provided:

All notices required or permitted under the terms of this Agreement shall be in writing and shall be
deemed to have been properly given and served when sent by overnight, Registered and/or Certified Mail, postage prepaid, returned receipt requested, properly addressed.

Zaft sued Golan on several business tort claims. According to the return of service, a process server personally served the documents on Golan in Israel, at the address specified for notices in the agreement. The court entered Golan’s default when Golan didn’t answer. Golan sought relief from the default on the grounds that he had not been properly served with process.
Continue reading Case of the Day: Zaft v. Golan

Case of the Day: Princeton Digital Image v. Konami Digital Entertainment

Dance Dance Revolution logo

The case of the day is Princeton Digital Image Corp. v. Konami Digital Entertainment Inc. (D. Del. 2016). The case was a patent infringement action against Konami, the developer of the Dance Dance Revolution video game . Princeton sought an order requiring Konami, the US subsidiary of Konami Holdings Corp., to produce documents in the possession of its sister subsidiary, Konami Japan, on the theory that the documents were within the US subsidiary’s control. (The ordinary test for what is discoverable, under FRCP 34, is that the documents must be in the responding party’s “possession, custody, or control”).
Continue reading Case of the Day: Princeton Digital Image v. Konami Digital Entertainment

Case of the Day: In re King.com

Candy Crush Saga logl

The case of the day is In re King.com Ltd. (N.D. Cal. 2016). King, a Maltese company, is the developer of the Candy Crush video game. It owned the European Candy Crush trademark and related marks. It sued Storm8 Studios LLC and TeamLava LLC in the Civil Court of Malta, alleging that their Candy Blast Mania game infringed the Candy Crush mark. The Maltese court stayed the action pending EU Intellectual Property Office review of a challenge to the validity of the marks. King brought an application under § 1782 seeking leave to depose Perry Tam, Chak Ming Li, and William Siu, Storm8 and TeamLava executives, for use in the Maltese action (after the stay is lifted). At the ex parte stage, King argued that the Maltese action would necessarily continue whatever the outcome of the validity proceedings, because several of the marks at issue in the infringement lawsuit were not at issue in the validity proceeding; that the validity proceedings might take a decade to complete; and that discovery now was important because Malta imposes no obligation to preserve evidence and “Respondents had a history of changing corporate forms.” The court granted the application.

After the court granted the application, the Maltese court entered an order requiring preservation of documentary evidence but denying King’s request for discovery. The respondents then moved to quash the US subpoena.
Continue reading Case of the Day: In re King.com