Archives

Case of the Day: O’Keeffe v. Adelson

Sheldon Adelson
Sheldon Adelson. Credit: Bectrigger

The case of the day is O’Keeffe v. Adelson (11th Cir. 2016). This is the appeal from In re Application of O’Keeffe (S.D. Fla. 2015), which I covered. Casino magnate Sheldon Adelson sued Wall Street Journal reporter Kate O’Keeffee in Hong Kong for defamation after she described him as a “scrappy, foul-mouthed billionaire from working class Dorchester, Mass.”
Continue reading Case of the Day: O’Keeffe v. Adelson

Case of the Day: Glock v. Glock, Inc.

The case of the day is Glock v. Glock, Inc. (11th Cir. 2015). Helga Glock was the former wife of Gaston Glock, creator of the Glock 17 handgun. The Glocks were engaged in divorce litigation in Austria. In 2013, Helga brought an application under § 1782 seeking evidence from Glock, Inc., Glock Professional, Inc., and Consultinvest, Inc., for use in the divorce proceedings. The three entities did not challenge the application, and the parties entered into a protective order limiting the use of documents marked “confidential” to proceedings to which Helga is a party.

Helga later filed a RICO action against Gaston and the Glock companies from which she had received discovery. Still later, in 2014, she asked the court that had granted her § 1782 application to authorize her to disclose the documents she had obtained in discovery to her RICO attorney for use in the RICO action. The magistrate judge granted her motion, but the district judge rejected the magistrate’s conclusion. Helga appealed.
Continue reading Case of the Day: Glock v. Glock, Inc.

Case of the Day: Ido v. Attorney General

The case of the day is Ido v. Attorney General (11th Cir. 2014). Yelkal Ido, an Ethopian national, sought asylum in the United States. His claim, recounted in the Eleventh Circuit’s 2012 decision, was that he had ties to the Oromo Liberation Front, an “outlawed nationalist movement that has taken up arms against the Ethiopian government because of its perceived marginalization of the Oromo.” In 2006, an immigration judge denied the claim on the grounds that Ido’s testimony was not credible. The Board of Immigration Appeals affirmed, basing its decision on the judge’s adverse credibility finding. In 2012, the Eleventh Circuit agreed with the BIA’s conclusion that Ido was not credible, but it remanded for a determination whether the documentary evidence Ido had presented independently supported his claim. The BIA again rejected the claim, and Ido again appealed.
Continue reading Case of the Day: Ido v. Attorney General